:: Site map:: Intranet
:: Research Areas:: Projects :: About CfPC:: News & Events:: Publications
       
  Publications  
   
   

The following is a list of the publically available documents from the CfPC Publication Series.

The CfPC Publication Series is in preparation, therefore, the list given below is only temporary.

The link from Document Number will bring you to the full document, stored as a PDF file, or as a Word file.

CfPC-2004-PB-67

Towards an Operational Framework for Architectural Prototyping

Author

Henrik Bærbak Christensen
Summary In this paper we present a case study of using architectural prototyping to explore an architectural design space. the case study will be treated as a data point representing one way of using architectural prototypes. Based on an analysis of the processes involved we present a first, tentative, framework that describes key concepts and their relationships.
CfPC-2004-PB-66

Interwoven Artifacts – Coordinating Distributed Collaboration in Medical Care

Author

Jakob E. Bardram and Claus Bossen
Summary In this article we focus on the affordances of a web of nonelectronic artifacts, and the different and partly overlapping roles and functionalities that characterizes this web of artifacts. We argue that an analysis of these affordances and the web of artifacts can be a resource for design, because they are evidence of some of the capabilities that are difficult to capture in software engineering and which are important for cooperative work. The affordances and
multiple roles and functionalities of a web of artifacts, are especially informative for design in the light of pervasive computing, which envisions a plethora of interactive artifacts embedded in our daily environment.
CfPC-2004-PB-65

Activity-Driven Computing Infrastructure–Pervasive Computing in Healthcare

Author

Jakob E. Bardram, Henrik Bærbak Christensen and Anders K. Olsen
Summary In many work settings, and especially in healthcare, work is distributed among many cooperating actors, who are constantly moving around and are frequently
interrupted. In line with other researchers, we use the term pervasive computing to describe a computing infrastructure that supports work where users access a dynamic range of computing and software devices, where users can shift between devices, and where users move around while preserving their working environment. This paper describes our design of a pervasive activity-driven computing infrastructure. The main tenet in this approach is to preserve a user’s computational working context enabling him to shift between different devices while on the move and enabling him to interrupt and return to work-activities fluently. Furthermore, the infrastructure contains agents that propose new activities based on the user’s current context. This activity-driven computing infrastructure has been designed and developed in close cooperation with a large Danish hospital and is being evaluated in a hospital setting.
CfPC-2004-PB-64

Open Issues in Activity-Based and Task-Level Computing

Author

Jakob E. Bardram and Henrik Bærbak Christensen
Summary The prevailing computer paradigms do a poor job at meeting their human users at their level of abstractions. Humans organize work and leisure in more or less well defined tasks and activities. Computers organize computing in terms of applications, files, networks, etc. This abstraction gap becomes a big problem in situations characterized by mobility, frequent interruptions, and collaboration—situations that pervasive computing is intended to support. A new paradigm, task-level or activity-based computing, has been proposed to lessen the abstraction gap and provide a better platform for pervasive computing. In his paper, we highlight some of the open issues that remain to be addressed in this paradigm.
CfPC-2004-PB-63

Supporting Pervasive Collaboration in Healthcare — An ActivityDriven
Computing Infrastructure

Author

Jakob E. Bardram and Henrik Bærbak Christensen
Summary Clinical work in modern hospitals is characterized by a high degree of mobility, frequent interruptions, and much ad hoc collaboration between colleagues with different expertise. Electronic patient record systems are typically build upon
the classic client-server architectural style that has evolved to support office work that do not have these properties. In this paper, we describe clinical work and compare it with office work. This analysis leads to the conclusion that the
mobile, interrupted, and ad hoc collaborative nature of clinical work is poorly supported by traditional client-server architectures and we propose an activity-driven computing infrastructure as an alternative. We outline our prototype design; argue how it supports clinical work and present initial results from testing the architecture in workshops with clinicians from Aarhus county hospital.
CfPC-2004-PB-62

Real-Time Collaboration in Activity Based Architectures

Author

Jakob E. Bardram and Henrik Bærbak Christensen
Summary With the growing research into mobile and ubiquitous computing, there is a need for addressing how such infrastructures can support collaboration between users while removed from the desktop. In this paper, we present the principles of Activity Based Computing (ABC), focusing on its support for collaboration in a ubiquitous computing environment. We discuss how this activity-centered design principle establish a conceptual and software architectural basis for session management in real-time, synchronous collaboration. We present the architecture of the ABC Framework, which is an implementation of these principles and discuss how collaboration support is made as part of the activity-centered architecture. We also discuss the need for more fine-grained state management policies in ubiquitous collaborative systems.
CfPC-2004-PB-61

The Java Context Awareness Framework (JCAF) – A Service Infrastructure and Programming Framework for Context-Aware Applications

Author

Jakob E. Bardram
Summary Context-awareness is a key concept in ubiquitous computing. But to avoid developing dedicated context-awareness sub-systems for specific application
areas there is a need for more generic programming frameworks. Such frameworks can help the programmer to develop and deploy context-aware applications faster. This paper describes the Java Context-Awareness Framework – JCAF, which is a Java-based context-awareness infrastructure and programming API for creating context-aware computer applications. The paper presents the design principles behind JCAF, its runtime architecture, and its programming API. The paper presents some applications of using JCAF in three different applications and discusses lessons learned from using JCAF.
CfPC-2004-PB-60

Proceedings of First International Workshop on Computer Support for Human Tasks and Activities

Author

Jakob E. Bardram, Henrik Bærbak Christensen, David Garlan and Joäo Sousa
Summary

This report contains the proceedings of the 2004 workshop on Computer Support for Human Tasks and Activities. All papers submitted to the workshop have been reviewed by two members of the Program Committee as well as by the workshop organizers.

The workshop aims at exploring issues related to improving the computational
support for human tasks and activities, with a special focus on infrastructures,
software architectures, models of user tasks, and on the challenges associated with designing and implementing those.

The goals of this workshop are the following:

  1. To build a network of researchers and practitioners working on aspects of task/activity-based computing
  2. To create awareness about ongoing research and to identify commonalities
  3. To foster collaboration among participants
CfPC-2004-PB-59

Architecture Presentations: Experiences from Pervasive Computing Projects at Computer Science Department, University of Aarhus

Author

Henrik Bærbak Christensen, Klaus Marius Hansen, Ulrik Pagh Schultz, Peter Ørbæk, Niels Oluf Bouvin
Summary

This report describes architectures and experiences with building these from a number of projects related to pervasive computing that have run with participants from Department of Computer Science, University of Aarhus over the last couple of years. The architectures were presented at a presentation day on 7th January 2004.

The main purpose of the presentation day and this document is to serve as referential basis for the work going into defining and researching architectures for palpable computing as described primarily by the work package 2 in the Description of Work for the PalCom EU project (http://www.palcom.dk). Software architectures are described and discussed as the primary benefits and liabilities of the architectures as well as the processes that lead to them are presented.

CfPC-2004-PB-58

Hopper’s Home and Hopper’s Hospital – Usability Laboratories for Home Care

Author

Jakob E. Bardram and Simon B. Larsen
Summary Usability labs have become a widespread tool in HCI research and practice, used in the design and evaluation of interactive computer systems. However, when designing pervasive computing applications for home health care, the traditional lab seems insufficient, because it cannot take into account the close cooperation over distance between health professionals and the patient. In this paper we present the approach taken at the Centre for Pervasive Healthcare,
where two labs located opposite each other provide the opportunity to simulate ’both ends of the line’ in tele-medicine applications.
CfPC-2004-PB-57

Socio-Technical Experiments - a New Approach on the Design Process

Author

Thomas Riisgaard Hansen
Summary

The design of pervasive interactive systems is an increasingly complex task. If interactive systems are going to be a pervasive part of our everyday lives it is important to bring the technical and the social together in the design process. Doing socio-technical experiments is a suggested method to achieve this.

The notion of socio-technical network will be used to identity three design challenges directed at integrating the technical and the social in the design process. The sociotechnical challenge, the multidisciplinary challenge and the
translating challenge. These challenges will be discussed and socio-technical experiments will be presented as an approach that addresses these challenge.

CfPC-2003-PB-56

An Initial Comparison between Aura and Activity-Based Computing

Author

Henrik Bærbak Christensen and Jakob E. Bardram
Summary In this report we outline an initial comparison between the Aura project’s architectural framework for task level computing, researched and developed at
Carnegie Mellon University, and the Activity-Based Computing Infrastructure,
researched and developed at Center for Pervasive Computing, University of Aarhus.
CfPC-2003-PB-55

Using Software Architectures for Designing Distributed Embedded Systems

Author

Henrik Bærbak Christensen
Summary In this paper, we outline an on-going project of designing distributed embedded systems for closed-loop process control. The project is a joint effort between software architecture researchers and developers from two companies that produce commercial embedded process control systems. The project has a strong emphasis on software architectural issues and terminology in order to envision, design and analyze design alternatives. We present two results.
First, we outline how focusing on software architecture, architectural issues and qualities are beneficial in designing distributed, embedded, systems. Second, we present two different architectures for closed-loop process control and discuss benefits and reliabilities.
CfPC-2003-PB-54

An Architectural Style for Closed-loop Process-Control

Author

Henrik Bærbak Christensen and Ole Eriksen
Summary This report describes an architectural style for distributed closed-loop process control systems with high performance and hard real-time constraints. The style strikes a good balance between the architectural qualities of performance and modifiability/maintainability that traditionally are often in conflict.
CfPC-2003-PB-53

A Programming Language Approach to
Safety in Home Networks

Author

Kjeld H. Mortensen, Kari S. F. Schougaard, Ulrik P. Schultz
Summary Home networks and the interconnection of home appliances is a classical theme in pervasive computing research. Security is usually addressed through the use of encryption and authentication, but there is a lack of awareness of safety: reventing the computerized house from harming the inhabitants, even in a worst-case scenario where an unauthorized user gains remote control of the facilities. We address this safety issue at the programming language level by restricting the operations that can be performed on devices according to the physical location of the user initiating the request. Operations that pose a potential safety hazard can only be performed within a physical proximity that ensures the safety of the operation. We define a conceptual model based on capabilities that define the origin of an action, and use a declarative approach integrated with an IDL language to express location-based restrictions on operations. This model has been implemented in a middleware for home AV devices written in Java, using infrared communication and a FireWire network to implement location awareness.
CfPC-2003-PB-52

Mobility in Healthcare - Reporting on our initial Observations and Pilot Study

Author

Jakob Bardram, Thomas Kjær and Christina Nielsen
Summary This document addresses mobility in healthcare and its consequences for the design of Electronic Patient Records (EPR), and presents a technical architecture and first prototype for mobile access to an EPR. The document describes our work in the Pervasive Healthcare project with Aalborg Hospital and IBM. It documents our initial field studies at department T, our observation of their use of the IBM Electronic Patient Record (IPR), and discusses some of the limitations of the current implementation and use of this classic client-server computer system. This is used as a stepping stone to describe and discuss our initial version of a prototype aiming at supporting mobility in healthcare. This prototype has been used at the department over 4 month period in a pilot study and we present an evaluation of its use. The audience of this document - as it is now - is people interested in our studies at typical mid-size Danish hospital and its use of EPR as well as people interested in designing and implementing mobile EPR solutions.
CfPC-2003-PB-51

Moving to get aHead: Local Mobility and Collaborative Work. In proceedings of ECSCW 2003

Author

Jakob E. Bardram and Claus Bossen
Summary Local mobility is a central aspect of collaborative work that is in need of close analysis. Between the face-to-face interaction of offices or control rooms and long-distance interaction facilitated through e.g. telephones, e-mail, the www or teleconfer-ences lie a number of work-settings in which actors move about continuously in order to accomplish their work. They do so because they need to get access to knowledge, re-sources, persons and/or places. We analyze the integral nature of mobility to this kind of work practice from the ethnographic description of a hospital department, and the chal-lenges that actors have to face to accomplish their work. Based on this ethnographic case, we propose a set of concepts for understanding local mobility as an intermediate field of distributed cooperation between centres of coordination and remote collaboration. Finally, we introduce the concept of ‘mobility work’ as complementary to the concept of ‘articulation work’.

CfPC-2003-PB-50

The Trouble with Login - User Authentication and Medical Cooperation

Author

Jakob E. Bardram
Summary Logging in by typing usernames and passwords is so fundamental to all computer systems that it has not received much attention. This paper reports from field studies of clinicians using an Electronic Patient Record and describes severe usability problems associated with its login procedures. We argue that such problems arise because login procedures designed for an office environment are transferred to a hospital environment without modification. The conventional login procedures do not in any sense recognize the nature of medical work as being nomadic, interrupted, and cooperative around sharing common material. The consequence is that login is circumvented and security is jeopardized. One of the core challenges in conventional user authentication mechanismsis their individual nature, which coresponds poorly with the cooperative nature of medical work. The paper describes the design of new user authentication mechanisms used in a pervasive computing infrastructure designed for hospitals.
CfPC-2003-PB-49
Artists in the Virtual Studio. In Madsen, K.H. (ed): Production Methods: Behind the Scenes of Virtual Inhabited 3D Worlds

Author

Lervig, M. & Madsen, KH.
Summary This chapter explores the work of three artists in the virtual studio, which is a video technology that makes it possible to combine videos of physical objects with video images generated in real time from digital 3D models. The theme thus becomes that of digital art, but where most research in this area is focussed on the works of art, the focus here is on the creative process involved in making the works.The chapter is based on three cases where artists work with a project group whose participants’ professional background is in architecture and digital 3D scenography. Based on the work with the three productions, we identify aspects of significance for the work process that takes place when this type of artistic activity is carried out in a virtual studio. These aspects are identified with the aim of gaining insight into, and a better understanding of the process, including reflections on how such processes can be planned.
CfPC-2003-PB-48
Dramaturgies as used in building multimedia products: devising and analysing. In Production Methods: Behind the Scenes of Virtual Inhabited 3D Worlds

Author

Kjølner, T. & Szatkowski, J.
Summary In this chapter, competencies from the theatre are revisited and considered as concrete working tools in devising processes that investigate the use of new technologies. Supported by central pragmatic concepts, we reflect on how our planning of such processes intends to be able to frame each step with a double perspective. The example used is the production of Manpower, a multimedia performance/exhibition that consisted of ten moveable projection screens, three performers, and some interaction with a small audience. We look at the production of artistic material, at building a fulfilling rapport with the audience, at devising dramaturgies and at compositional strategies. A concluding section discusses the importance of teambuilding in multimedia productions.
CfPC-2003-PB-47
Developing new skills for live 3D animation. In In Production Methods: Behind the Scenes of Virtual Inhabited 3D Worlds

Author

Callesen, J.
Summary Performance animation is a new art form made possible through Motion Capture techniques and real-time 3D animation. The family factory was an interdisciplinary theatre production merging skills central to performance animation: puppet theatre, animation and programming. In this chapter, the collaborative artistic process behind the family factory is analysed as a case, focusing on the application and integration of the skills that the various participants represent.This is followed by a discussion of a production method for performance animation, drawing on a variety of more established collaborative production methods: traditional systems development, games development, film production as a collaborative process, experimental theatre production, animation production and music video production.
CfPC-2003-PB-46
Supporting Human Activities— Exploring Activity-Centered Computing. In proceedings of UbiComp2002

Author

Henrik Bærbak Christensen and Jakob E. Bardram
Summary In this paper we explore an activity-centered computing paradigm that is aimed at supporting work processes that are radically different from the ones known from office work. Our main inspiration is healthcare work that is characterized by an extreme degree of mobility, many interruptions, ad-hoc collaboration based on shared material, and organized in terms of well-defined, recurring, work activities.We propose that this kind of work can be supported by a pervasive computing infrastructure together with domain-specific services, both designed from a perspective where work activities are first class objects. We also present an exploratory prototype design and first implementation and present some initial results from evaluations in a healthcare environment.
CfPC-2003-PB-45
From music to 3D Scenography and Back Again. In Production Methods: Behind the Scenes of Virtual Inhabited 3D Worlds

Author

Lervig, M.
Summary The production of PERSONA 3D, a work aiming to produce aesthetic material for a live performance, included several digital technologies such as video, 3D modelling, virtual scenography, motion capture and music. A singer was motion captured as well as videotaped, and these data were used along with the auditive data in order to combine the extracts and use them in a live performance. This chapter demonstrates the implementation of process-analytical tools, as described by Donald Schön in The Reflective Practitioner, during an artistic process in the field of digital multimedia art. The analysis is particularly interested in how a single individual artist deals with situations where his knowledge is limited – and tries with this focus to uncover strategies for approaching new technology.
CfPC-2003-PB-44
Conceptual Abstraction in Modeling with Physical and Informational Material. In L.Qvortrup et al.: Virtual Application: Applications With Virtual Inhabited 3D Worlds

Author

D.C-M.May, B.B.Kristensen, P.Nowack
Summary  
CfPC-2002-PB-43
Promises, Premises and Risks: Sharing Responsibilities, Working Up Trust and Sustaining Commitment in Participatory Design Projects.
In Proceedings of the Participatory Design Conference (PDC 2002)

Author

Büscher, M., Hartswood, M., Mogensen, P., Procter, R., Shapiro, D., Slack, R., & Voß, A.
Summary While participatory design crosses the boundaries between technology production and use, it does not erase them. In accounts of participatory projects, the work of negotiating and changing these boundaries often recedes into the background, yet it is crucial in shaping the very nature and scope of what is achievable. In this paper, we report on our various experiences of ‘boundary crossing’ in four very different participatory design contexts. We argue that in each setting a key task consists of enlisting the effort, imagination, trust and commitment of users, and the sharing of risks and responsibilities. We compare and discuss the different strategies, methods we have devised to achieve this within the local politics of each setting.
CfPC-2002-PB-42
Towards Geo-Spatial Hypermedia: Concepts and Prototype Implementation
In Proceedings of the HyperText 2002

Author

Grønbæk, K., Vestergaard, P. P., & Ørbæk, P.
Summary This paper combines spatial hypermedia with techniques from Geographical Information Systems and location based services. We describe the Topos 3D Spatial Hypermedia system and how it has been developed to support geo-spatial hypermedia coupling hypermedia information to model representations of real world buildings and landscapes. The prototype experiments are primarily aimed at supporting architects and landscape architects in their work on site. Here it is useful to be able to superimpose and add different layers of information to, e.g. a landscape depending on the task being worked on. We introduce a number of central concepts to understand the relation between hypermedia and spatial information management. The distinction between metaphorical (and abstract) versus literal (and concrete) spaces is introduced together with a workspace composition semantics and a distinction between direct and indirect navigation. Finally, we conclude with a number of research issues which are central to the future development of geo-spatial hypermedia, including design issues in combining metaphorical and literal hypermedia space, as well as a discussion of the role of spatial parsing in a geo-spatial context.
CfPC-2002-PB-41
Issues in Implementing Distributed Object Systems

Author

Henrik Bærbak Christensen
Summary This paper presents a checklist of issues that must be considered when one attempts at implementing a distributed object system based upon remote method invocation. The check-list is in its early stage and does not attempt at being complete. Also the check-list only summerises issues but does not provide any solutions.
CfPC-2002-PB-40
Distributed Object Systems
A Terminology Document

Author

Henrik Bærbak Christensen
Summary Middleware technologies for supporting distributed object oriented programming
are widespread. Many of these employ variations over the same core technology but often use different terminology. The purpose of this report is
to provide a common terminology that describes key abstractions. Our focus
is embedded systems, and the presentation owes much to the fact that our
underlying bus system is the CAN-bus.
CfPC-2002-PB-39
Virtual Video Prototyping of Pervasive Healthcare Systems. The proceedings of DIS . In proceedings of DIS 2002

Author

Bardram, J., Bossen C., Lykke-Olesen, A., Madsen, K.H. & Nielsen, R.
Summary Virtual studio technology enables the mixing of physical and digital 3D objects and thus expands the way of representing design ideas in terms of virtual video prototypes, which offers new possibilities for designers by combining elements of prototypes, mock-ups, scenarios, and conventional video. In this article we report our initial experience in the domain of pervasive healthcare with producing virtual video prototypes and using them in a design workshop. Our experience has been predominantly favourable. The production of a virtual video prototype forces the designers to decide very concrete design issues, since one cannot avoid paying attention to the physical, real-world constrains and to details in the usage-interaction between users and technology. From the users’ perspective, during our evaluation of the virtual video prototype, we experienced how it enabled users to relate to the practicalities and context of applied technology. One of the main limitations experienced in the creation of the virtual video prototypes is the lack of user-involvement.
CfPC-2002-PB-38
Supporting Mobility and Collaboration in Ubiquitous Computing

Author

Jakob E. Bardram
Summary For unknown reasons, research into ubiquitous computing seems to pay no attention to collaboration among users in such an environment. This paper presents the design philosophy of activity-based computing (abc) and a technical implementation of it in a ubiquitous computing infrastructure, the ABC framework, which takes collaboration in ubiquitous environments as its starting point. The idea of activity-based computing and the aim of the framework is to: (i) support the human activity by managing its collection of work tasks on a computer, (ii) to support mobility by porting activities across heterogeneous computing environments, (iii) to support asynchronous collaboration by allowing several people to participate in an activity, and (iv) to support synchronous, real-time collaboration by enabling 'desktop conferring' by sharing the activity across several clients. During a period of two years, our framework have been co-designed and evaluated in cooperation with a range of clinicians in a hospital.
CfPC-2002-PB-37
Executable Use Cases for Pervasive Healthcare

Author

Jens Bæk Jørgensen and Claus Bossen
Summary Using a pervasive healthcare system as example, a new approach to
specification of user requirements for pervasive IT systems is presented.
A formal modelling language, Coloured Petri Nets, is applied to describe
what we call Executable Use Cases, EUCs. EUCs are precise, detailed,
and executable descriptions of future work processes and their computer
support. In particular, EUCs allow user requirements specifications to
take the frequently changing context of the users, e.g. their location and
equipment in possession, into account.
CfPC-2002-PB-36
Coloured Petri Nets in UML-Based Software Development– Designing Middleware for Pervasive Healthcare

Author

Jens Bæk Jørgensen
Summary Nowadays, the Unified Modeling Language, UML, is almost univer-sally
accepted by the software industry as the modelling language. How-ever,
the language has severe shortcomings. While UML is well suited to
model the static aspects of software systems, the language as it is
currently
standardised strongly needs improvements with respect to modelling
be-haviour.
Thus, for development of software components with complex
behaviours, UML often cannot stand alone. The main contribution of
this paper is to position and discuss promotion of Coloured Petri Nets, or
more generally high-level Petri nets, as a supplement in UML-based software
development. We make the case on a specific example, development
of middleware to support what is termed pervasive healthcare, but the
observations hold in general for many systems with complex behaviours.
CfPC-2002-PB-35
Executable Design Models for a Pervasive Healthcare Middleware System

Author

Jens Bæk Jørgensen and Søren Christensen
Summary UML is applied in the design of a pervasive healthcare mid-
dleware system for the hospitals in Aarhus County, Denmark. It works
well for the modelling of static aspects of the system, but with respect
to describing the behaviour, UML is not sufficient. This paper explains
why and, as a remedy, suggests to supplement the UML models with
behaviour descriptions in the modelling language Coloured Petri Nets,
CPN. CPN models are executable and fine-grained, and a combined use
of UML and CPN thus supports design-time investigation of the detailed
behaviour of system components. In this way, the behavioural conse-
quences of alternative design proposals may be evaluated and compared,
based on models and prior to implementation.
CfPC-2002-PB-34
Modelling of Features and Feature Interactions in Nokia Mobile hones
Using Coloured Petri Nets

Author

Louise Lorentsen, Antti-Pekka Tuovinen, and Jianli Xu
Summary This paper reports on the main results from an industrial co-
operation project. The project is a joint project between Nokia Research
Centre and the CPN group at the University of Aarhus.The purpose of
the project was to investigate features and feature interactions in devel-
opment of Nokia mobile phones through construction of a Coloured Petri
Nets (CPN)model.The model is extended with domain-specific graphics and
Message Sequence Charts to enable mobile phone user interface
designers and software developers who are not familiar with Petri Nets
to work with the model.The paper presents the CPN model constructed
in the project,describes how domain-specific graphics and Message e-
quence Charts are used in simulations of the CPN model,and discusses
how the project and in particular the construction of the CPN model has
influenced the development process of features in Nokia mobile phones.
CfPC-2002-PB-33
Three-Dimensional reconstruction from MRI for Preoperative Planning in Congenital Heart Disease. Proceedings of the Society for Medical Innovation and Technology SMIT

Author

Sørensen, T. S.; S. V. Therkildsen, O. K. Hansen, K. Sørensen, E. M. Pedersen
Summary  
CfPC-2002-PB-32
Pervasive Computing: Mapping TangO Model onto Jini Technology. Proceedings of the 6th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics

Author

K.Hallenborg, B.B.Kristensen
Summary  
CfPC-2002-PB-31
Tangible Objects—Connecting Informational and Physical Space

Author

P.B.Andersen, P.Nowack
Summary  
CfPC-2002-PB-30
Designing Pervasive, Habitat Adaptable Software Applications. MSc Project

Author

C.Gersbo-Møller
Summary  
CfPC-2002-PB-29
Applying Multi Agent System Methodologies to a Production System Application. MSc Project

Author

L.K.Jensen
Summary  
CfPC-2002-PB-28
Positionsbestemmelse i trådløse netværk. BSc Project

Author

S.Aa.Jørgensen
Summary  
CfPC-2002-PB-27
Two-phase active contour method for semiautomatic segmentation of the heart and blood vessels from MRI images for 3D visualization

Author

Makowski, P.; T. S. Sørensen, S. V. Therkildsen, P. Materka, H. Stødkilde-Jørgensen and E. M. Pedersen
Summary The paper presents an active-contour segmentation method for 2D structures in MR images. The method combines two approaches to active contour segmentation, known as balloons and snakes. This makes the method shape independent and accurate. New anti-tangling features were introduced to improve segmentation of very complex object shapes, e.g. the left ventricle with papillary muscles. The method was applied to segment all large structures in the cardiovascular system and its outcome was used for 3D visualization.
CfPC-2002-PB-26
Total cavo-pulmonary connection: a virtual 3-dimensional fly-through. Circulation

Author

Sørensen, T. S. ; S. V. Therkildsen, O. K. Hansen, K. Sørensen, E. M. Pedersen
Summary  
CfPC-2002-PB-25
IR kommunikation mellem RCX og VISOR. BSc Project

Author

J.Lorenzen
Summary  
CfPC-2002-PB-24
Positionsbestemmelse og bevægelse med RCX og Visor. BSc Project

Author

J.G.Hermansen
Summary  
CfPC-2002-PB-23
Analyse og udvikling af en LegoBot til simulering af et industrielt system. BSc Project

Author

B.Jensen
Summary  
CfPC-2001-PB-22
Finding Hyper-Structure in Space: Spatial Parsing in 3D

Author

Nielsen, M. B., & Ørbæk, P.
Summary Spatial parsers augment spatial hypermedia systems by letting the computer perceive the informal – but visually apparent – groupings formed by humans working with a spatial hypermedia tool. A number of research systems implementing 2D spatial parsing have been described in recent years. This paper extends spatial parsing to 3D and describes an implementation of a tailorable 3D spatial parser for the Topos system: a 3D information organization tool for use on desktops, interactive whiteboards and tables. The parser maintains a proximity graph of the heterogeneous 3D objects and applies structure experts and global repression and reinforcement techniques to this graph to find structures. A number of issues pertaining to 3D parsing as opposed to 2D parsing are discussed. The paper also presents a simple and efficient 2D parser for 3D scenes and compares it to the true 3D parser.
CfPC-2001-PB-21
Interaction Techniques for Spatial Organization of Digital and Physical materials - the Topos Approach

Author

Ørbæk, P., Mogensen, P, and Grønbæk, K
Summary We are working in the domain of interactive workspaces supporting distributed organisation of and collaboration on diverse digital and physical materials. For this purpose we have developed a spatial computing infrastructure called Topos. Topos is instantiated in a a variety of prototypes providing a 3D environment supporting handling, relating, sharing, and arranging of diverse materials (drawings, pictures, 3D models, spreadsheets, etc.).
CfPC-2001-PB-20
Vision on the move - technologies for the footloose

Author

Büscher, M., Krogh, P., Mogensen, P., & Shapiro, D.
Summary Jobs don't always get done in the office. Getting up to speed in a taxi is not unusual for many professionals. They are nomads even though their work is highly information intensive, requiring people to carry their work materials around with them. Creative work, central to many professions in aesthetic design and architecture is a particular case in point. Close observation of the how, why and where of creative work can be an inspirational resource for a different group of designers - those concerned with the design of future technologies. Drawing on an ethnographic study of landscape architects we - an interdisciplinary team of work analysts, practitioners, and system designers - present a scenario of how creative work on the move might be supported.
CfPC-2001-PB-19
Spaces of Practice
In W. Prinz et al. (Ed.), Proceedings of the Seventh European Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work

Author

Monika Büscher, Preben Mogensen and Dan Shapiro
Summary This paper compares the properties of physical and digital workspaces in the context of a prototype of a collaborative virtual environment. that has been developed with reference to work in design professions and concentrates on the organisation of work materials. Spatial properties are analysed in terms of the sociality of workspace use. Digital spaces can be engineered to mimic or to transcend various constraints and affordances of physical workspaces, and they can be given parallel, folded and tunnelled properties. We examine the consequences these have for the readiness-to-hand, intelligibility, and accountability of the resulting workspaces. We address means of interacting with these extended environments. Using case study scenarios, we demonstrate how ethnographic analysis and participatory design have informed the architecture, features and development of the system.
CfPC-2001-PB-18
Spatial Parsing within the Topos 3D Environment
Position Paper of the First Workshop on Spatial Hypermedia 2001

Author

Nielsen, M. B., & Ørbæk, P.
Summary Spatial parsers augment spatial hypermedia systems by letting the computer perceive the informal – but visually apparent – groupings formed by humans working with a spatial hypermedia tool. A number of research systems implementing 2D spatial parsing have been described in recent years. This position paper describes an implementation of a tailorable 3D spatial parser for the Topos system: a 3D information organization tool for use on desktops, interactive whiteboards and tables. A number of issues pertaining to 3D parsing as opposed to 2D parsing are discussed.
CfPC-2001-PB-17
The interactive design collaboratorium In M. Hirose (Ed.), Proceedings of the Interact '01

Author

Susanne Bødker, Peter Krogh, Marianne Graves Petersen
Summary Abstract This paper reports on an experimental process in which a prototype was developed of an interactive design collaboratorium, in cooperation with a group of usability designers. In a longterm research cooperation, this usability group has changed its work practice in order to work in the design collaboratorium. The design collaboratorium was developed to move usability design away from a lab towards an open physical and organizational space where designers, users and engineers meet and collaborate, or work alongside each other. The cooperation between researchers and the usability group has resulted in practical experimentation in projects and in design of an experimental design collaboratorium employing electronic whiteboards, 3D design documentation, etc. This experimental prototype has been evaluated in cooperative workshops. We report on the results of this evaluation.
CfPC-2001-PB-16
Interactive Room Support for Complex and Distributed Design Projects
In M. Hirose (Ed.), Proceedings of the Interact '01

Author

Kaj Grønbæk, Kristian Gundersen, Preben Mogensen, Peter Ørbæk
Summary We are investigating the design of digital 3D interaction technology embedded in a physical environment. We take as point of departure complex, collaborative industrial design projects involving heterogeneous sets of documents, and physical as well as digital 3D models. The paper introduces our notion of interactive room technology supporting industrial design and describes two examples of this technology: the Designers' Workbench and the 3D Whiteboard, both integrated in a common distributed and collaborative infrastructure. The paper also describes a number of new easy-to-grab and lightweight interaction devices being experimented with in the interactive room environment. The interactive room technologies have all been designed with the requirement that they must seamlessly integrate both into the physical and into the digital work environment, while providing new affordances for industrial design work.
CfPC-2001-PB-15
Intelligent Buildings and pervasive computing - research perspectives and discussions

Author

Kaj Grønbæk, Peter Krogh & Morten Kyng
Summary Intelligent Buildings have been the subject of research and commercial interest for more than two decades. The different perspectives range from monitoring and controlling energy consumption over interactive rooms supporting work in offices and leisure in the home, to buildings providing information to by-passers in plazas and urban environments. This paper puts forward the hypothesis that the coming decade will witness a dramatic increase in both quality and quantity of intelligent buildings due to the emerging field of pervasive computing: the next generation computing environments where computers are everywhere, for everyone, at all times. Where IT becomes a still more integrated part of our environments with processors, sensors, and actuators connected via high-speed networks and combined with new visualization devices ranging from projections directly in the eye to large panorama displays. This paper provides an overview of the field and discusses some central future research perspectives.
CfPC-2001-PB-14
Roomware and Intelligent Buildings - obejcts and buildings become computer interfaces.

Author

Peter Krogh & Kaj Grønbæk
Summary Information Technology until recent years mainly have been driven by technological possibilities based on research methods developed within engineering and natural science. The capacity and the ever-decreasing size of IT enable penetration into almost any object. IT can no longer be regarded as an isolated technological possibility; through networks and telecommunication it has become an integrated part of our everyday life. We illustrate this perspective with a point of departure in supporting work practices for Designers and Architects by examples from our interactive room laboratory, the iRoom. IT alters the ways we connect both cultural and social. On the basis of this aestheticresearch perspectives have become essential in the further development of IT research regarding the environmental impact and cultural changes imposed by the use of IT. Furthermore IT has the potential to alter the premises for design and architecture in more general terms. This paper will discus ways and premises for enabling a common basis of both scientific and aesthetic research in this domain and ways of including architectural and artistic approaches to integration of IT in living and work environments.
CfPC-2001-PB-13
Middleware for Pervasive Healthcare

Author

Jakob E. Bardram and Henrik Bærbak Christensen
Summary This white paper describes work-in-progress at the Center for Pervasive Computing (CfPC) at University of Aarhus. We describe our pervasive healthcare project, which is a collaboration between hospitals in the county of Aarhus, a Danish software company developing an electronic patient record solution, and CfPC. The aim of the paper is to present and discuss a vision of a middleware architecture for pervasive computing within clinical work settings. Our research is grounded in careful observations of clinical work within a hospital and we start by outlining recurring scenarios in the daily life of healthcare staff and sketch how pervasive middleware technologies may provide a strong foundation for pervasive and mobile solutions in this setting.
CfPC-2001-PB-12
Interactive Room Support for Complex and Distributed Design Projects. To appear in proceedings of Interact

Author

Grønbæk, K., Gundersen, K.K., Mogensen, P., and Ørbæk, P.
Summary  
CfPC-2001-PB-11
Pervasive Computing. BSc Project

Author

S. H. Bøggild, S. E. Jensen
Summary  
CfPC-2001-PB-10
A new virtual reality approach for planning of cardiac interventions

Author

Sørensen, T. S.; S. V. Therkildsen, P. Makowski, J. L. Knudsen and E. M. Pedersen
Summary A novel approach to three-dimensional (3D) visualization of high quality,
respiratory compensated cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) data is presented
with the purpose of assisting the cardiovascular surgeon and the invasive
cardiologist in the pre-operative planning. Developments included: (1)
optimization of 3D, MR scan protocols; (2) dedicated segmentation software;
(3) optimization of model generation algorithms; (4) interactive, virtual
reality visualization. The approach is based on a tool for interactive,
real-time visualization of 3D cardiac MR datasets in the form of 3D heart
models displayed on virtual reality equipment. This allows the cardiac
surgeon and the cardiologist to examine the model as if they were actually
holding it in their hands. To secure relevant examination of all details
related to cardiac morphology, the model can be re-scaled and the viewpoint
can be set to any point inside the heart. Finally, the original, raw MR
images can be examined on line as textures in cut-planes through the heart
models.
CfPC-2001-PB-9
Use of theatre as Models: Discussing Computers as Theatre - Some Additional Perspectives. In Qvortrup, L. (ed): Virtual Interaction: Interaction in Virtual Inhabited 3D Worlds

Author

Kjølner, T. & Lehmann, N.
Summary  
CfPC-2001-PB-8
Tangible Objects: Modeling In Style. Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Generative Systems in the Electronic Arts

Authors

D.C-M.May, B.B.Kristensen, P.Nowack
Summary  
CfPC-2000-PB-7
From usability lab to "design collaboratorium": Reframing usability practice. DIS 2000, Conference proceedings on Designing interactive systems: processes, practices, methods, and techniques

Author

Buur, J., Bødker, S.
Summary  
CfPC-2000-PB-6
Creativity, Complexity, and Precision: Information Visualization for (Landscape) Architecture. Accepted for Visualisation 2000

Author

Büscher, M., Christensen, M., Mogensen, P., Shapiro, D., Ørbæk, P.
Summary  
CfPC-2000-PB-5
Collaborative Augmented Reality Environments: Integrating VR, Working Materials, and Distributed Work Spaces. In Proceedings of the Collaborative Virtual Environments

Author

Büscher, M., Christensen, M., Grønbæk, K., Krogh, P., Mogensen, P., Shapiro, D., Ørbæk, P.
Summary  
CfPC-2000-PB-4
Hypermedia in the Virtual Project Room. - Toward Open 3D Spatial Hypermedia. In Proceedings of the Eleventh Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia

Author

Mogensen, P., Grønbæk, K.
Summary  
CfPC-2000-PB-3
A Real-Time Software Video Codec based on Wavelets. In Proceedings of International Conference on Communication Technology

Author

Ørbæk, P.
Summary  
CfPC-2000-PB-2
An Experimental System for Distributed Classroom Education. In Proceedings of the TERENA Networking Conferenc

Author

Ørbæk, P.
Summary  
CfPC-2001-PB-1
Theme One: Administration and Documentation of Medicine

Author

Henrik Bærbak Christensen, Jakob Bardram, Søren Dittmer
Summary This report describes results from theme one in the Pervasive Computing in health Care project. The project is a collaboration between ≈rhus Amtssygehus (AAS), Systematic Software Engineering A/S (SSE), and Center for Pervasive Computing, University of Aarhus (CfPC). The subject of theme one is edication i.e. to provide mobile and pervasive computing support for the activities of pouring, giving, and documenting medicine given to patients by nurses.

 

 

Top

 
 CfPC©, updated: 8-feb-03